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EVE Online MMO Universe Assessement Using Social Network Analysis

So using the EVE API I downloaded the star system list and their connections from the EVE Online Universe–a favorite time-passing hobby of mine–and ran several network and visualization analysis on the data. I found some interesting results and posted a complete visual which is searchable on my blog for all to see EVE Universe Map Using Network Analysis

One of the interesting things I found is that the CCP Devs used clustering in naming the regions and sectors within EVE based on the number of jumps between groups of systems–a high number of jumps (algorithmically) creates a region. There’s a bunch of other subtle stuff like this which I’ll write-up in a blog post sometime.

Here’s a little of the meaty parts of the analysis:

Systems with high levels of the BC score are great for gate-camping because of the low likelihood of concord or other corp or alliances being able to respond. They also cross over regions (they are the big(er) circles on the searchable visual) which means that escape for those who choose to battle on behalf of their alliances is more likely because there are multiple escape routes.

Systems with high levels of EVC are great for trade. they are (probability-wise) are more likely to have items bough from, plus because high EVC systems are clustered together, they form clusters of trade hubs  (if you search for Jita or Rens, you’ll see that they are neither, which means that they are unnatural trade hubs–all marketing and word of mouth–if the forums didn’t exist Jita and Rens WOULD NOT be trade hubs).

There are other factors involved in making war, trade, and flying decisions of course, but I think a common Alliance vs. Alliance war problem is that they don’t have a good grasp of the lay of land so to speak.  Maps can help them make better decisions, and I’m willing to trade!

About The Author
Joseph A.E. Shaheen
Computational Social Scientist. Former Consultant. Current Phd Student. Editor of the Human Talent Network community blog. I fought ISIS/ISIL/Daesh in my own way. Livin' life in Washington, DC
5 Comments
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  • caisman
    Mar 12, 2014 at 8:58 am

    Good stuff m8 o7

  • alejandro rivero
    Mar 12, 2014 at 7:24 pm

    I like that you have used betweeness instead of pagerank, for the diameter of the nodes.

  • alejandro rivero
    Mar 12, 2014 at 7:34 pm

    my pdfs of EVE 😀 http://t.co/3c2wOfSeam I am actually intrigued by your web visualization tool, is it a gephi extension?

  • Jul 24, 2014 at 12:58 am

    I’d debate the point about Jita being a “forced” trade hub; Jita was still the largest hub back when I started playing in 2004 and nothings changed.

  • Jul 24, 2014 at 1:18 am

    Hi Ninja: I agree that it is not a forced trade hub in the sense of the word, but from a strictly “network” perspective it is- without taking into consideration any other factor. I’m hypothesizing that there are a number of other (also valid and important) reasons it evolved into one. But in a world where nothing else other than the structure of the network matters (which is not true of course) Jita would be an un-natural trade hub because the natural ones would be the ones with the highest betweenness centrality, allowing traders to gain an advantageous bargaining position with consumers (pilots who are not engaged in mining or trading).

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