Issues of Employment Branding and the Psychological Contract: A Discussion

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Employment branding (sometimes also referred to as employee branding and employer branding) has recently garnered much attention from both academic scholars and practitioners alike. It’s becoming the new sought-after competitive advantage that recruiting leaders will need to seek. Thus, organizations are now forced to make considerable investments in their branding.

Description

This article was originally published by the Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership.

To cite, use:

Shaheen, Joseph (2010) . Issues of Employment Branding and the Psychological Contract: A Discussion. Journal of Corporate Recruiting Leadership, Volume 5, Issue 7, pp. 7-13

Abstract

Employment branding (sometimes also referred to as employee branding and employer branding) has recently garnered much attention from both academic scholars and practitioners alike. It’s becoming the new sought-after competitive advantage that recruiting leaders will need to seek. Thus, organizations are now forced to make considerable investments in their branding.

However, in the race to create the best employment brand, leaders can often ignore what they believe to be nuances or unimportant items attached to their branding efforts and marketing campaigns. For example, in communicating the value proposition of one’s company, an expectation begins to take shape. That expectation is often called the psychological contract. The forming of the psychological contract becomes more important once an employee is recruited into an organization, and its effects are embodied in quantitative retention and engagement metrics. Additionally, issues such as brand strength, the ability to localize marketing messages to local culture, dilution of brand messaging due to overuse of a flexible workforce, and implications on issues of diversity and inclusion and talent management especially in generational contexts, become issues worthy of discussion.

To gain insight into this subject, we will review selected pieces of the employment branding literature as well as analyze the concept of the psychological contract that is formed when an employee is attracted by an organization’s branding efforts.

Keywords: recruiting, talent acquisition, employment branding, employer branding, psychological contract

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